Northern Fiction Alliance says publishing industry should move north

A group of independent fiction publishers from across northern England has called on the book industry to be less “London-centric”.

The Northern Fiction Alliance (NFA) said in an open letter big publishers should “set up outside of London”.

Publishers need to “better reflect its readers and society”, it said.

Penguin Random House UK said: “In the past few years we have put a number of different schemes and initiatives in place to reduce barriers to entry.”

The NFA said the industry should be “diversifying our workforces and, perhaps more importantly, dispersing across the UK in order to better engage with and embolden a new generation of writers, readers and aspiring publishers”.

London-based Penguin Random House said it had removed the need for a university degree from all jobs, introduced paid work-experience and held careers talks across the country.

The company’s WriteNow scheme finds talented new writers from under-represented communities and is mentoring 23 writers “61% of whom are based outside London and we have already offered five of these writers publishing deals”, added the spokesperson.

Joanne Harris, the Barnsley-born writer of Chocolat who is published in more than 50 countries, said there was “a systematic leeching of resources by the current government from the provinces in general.

“Arts cuts, library closures, museum and theatre closures, etc all based on the idea that only London matters.”

Ann Chadwick, of Cause UK representing the Harrogate Crime Writing festival, said the idea of a northern base for big publishers was a “brilliant idea”.

Ms Chadwick said the annual festival, showed the north could have “that kind of impact” and confirmed “life outside London”.

Hannah Bannister, of Peepal Tree Press from Leeds, said: “Power is concentrated in London and the South East and publishing is dominated by a handful of large corporations but there is more creativity than they can cope with.”

Ms Bannister said a potential author in the north faced problems if he or she “couldn’t afford the ticket to London”.

The NFA was formed in 2016 and includes 11 independent publishers.

These are Comma Press (Manchester), Peepal Tree Press (Leeds), Dead Ink Books (Liverpool), And Other Stories (Sheffield), Saraband (Salford), Blue Moose (Hebden Bridge) Tilted Axis (Sheffield) Mayfly (Newcastle), Route (Pontefract), Valley Press (Scarborough) and Wrecking Ball (Hull).

Southern Health fined £2m over deaths of two patients

An NHS trust that admitted failing two patients who died in its care, one in a bath, has been fined £2m.

Connor Sparrowhawk, 18, drowned in Oxford in 2013. Teresa Colvin, 45, died in Hampshire in 2012.

Southern Health admitted to “systemic failures” and pleaded guilty in 2017 to breaching health and safety laws.

Passing sentence at Oxford Crown Court, Mr Justice Stuart-Smith said each death was an “unnecessary human tragedy”.

The trust will pay £950,000 for Mrs Colvin’s death and just over £1m for that of Connor Sparrowhawk.

The judge said the penalty was “a just and proportionate outcome that marks the seriousness of the Trust’s offending, the terrible consequences of that offending, and the other material factors that I have indicated”.

He said it was a “regrettable fact” Dr Sara Ryan, Mr Sparrowhawk’s mother, and Roger Colvin, Teresa Colvin’s husband, had to campaign to uncover problems at the trust.

The judge paid tribute in particular to Dr Ryan who had to endure “entirely unjustified criticism” during her JusticeforLB campaign – named after her son’s nickname Laughing Boy.

  • Southern Trust admits “failing” Teresa Colvin
  • NHS Trust admits guilt of death of teenaged patient
  • Southern Health appoints new chief executive

    A victim impact statement from Dr Ryan made for “almost unbearable reading,” he said.

    He acknowledged the trust’s early indication it would plead guilty and said Southern Health had made it completely clear it would not attempt to shift responsibility to individuals.

    Speaking outside court, Teresa Colvin’s husband Roger said his wife – who he called TJ – had been “a vivacious, beautiful, and loving woman”.

    “Six years on, so many questions play over in my mind”, he said, adding his life was “much poorer” for her loss. “We all loved her so dearly,” he said.

    “TJ and I believed the hospital was a place of safety and Southern Health failed her,” he added.

    Mr Sparrowhawk’s mother thanked the judge for his summary of Southern Health’s failures and also thanked the Health and Safety Executive for their “meticulous investigation”.

    She added: “No-one should die a preventable death in the care of the state.

    “I’m left thinking if Connor was here now in the shadow of Oxford Crown Court and St Aldates police station, he would say: ‘Why mum?’ And I would say: ‘I don’t know, but we’ve done you proud’.”

    ‘Entirely preventable’

    In its submissions to the court, Southern Health acknowledged the deaths were “entirely preventable” and were “a matter of significant regret” it did not address its failures quicker.

    Dr Nick Broughton, its chief executive, said he wanted to “apologise unreservedly”.

    He was ordered to stand during the final part of the sentencing by the judge as an acknowledgement of the trust’s historic failings.

    Speaking outside court, he said: “Those mistakes and those failures had dire consequences.

    “Both Connor and Teresa should not have died. That is a matter of profound regret to me and the organisation, and I am truly sorry. We let them down and we let their families down,” he said.

    The deaths had “served as a catalyst for change,” he added.

    Dr Broughton was appointed in September after previous boss Katrina Percy resigned after it was revealed the trust had failed to investigate hundreds of deaths of patients in its care.

    Southern Health employs more than 6,000 staff and owns or manages 136 sites, including 15 mental health facilities and two for people with learning difficulties.


    Southern Health Timeline

    26 April 2012 – Teresa Colvin dies at Southampton General Hospital after she was found unconscious at Woodhaven Adult Mental Health Hospital

    July 2013 – Connor Sparrowhawk, 18, drowns after an epileptic seizure at Oxford unit Slade House. An inquest later rules neglect contributed to his death

    10 December 2015 – The BBC reveals details of a leaked independent report into the trust, produced by Mazars, which highlights a “failure of leadership”. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt says he is “profoundly shocked”

    17 December 2015 – The report is officially published and shows out of 722 unexpected deaths over four years, only 272 were properly investigated

    29 April 2016 – A full CQC inspection report is published which says the trust is continuing to put patients at risk

    30 June 2016 – Following a review of the management team competencies, it is announced that the trust’s boss Katrina Percy is to keep her job

    29 July 2016 – The BBC reveals the trust paid millions of pounds in contracts to companies owned by previous associates of Ms Percy

    7 October 2016 – Ms Percy resigns completely from the trust

    13 December 2016 – A CQC report, the culmination of a one-year inquiry, says investigations into patient deaths are inadequate

    19 August 2017 – A medical tribunal finds a doctor failed to carry out risk assessments for Connor Sparrowhawk

    12 September 2017 – The trust announces Dr Nick Broughton, leader of Somerset Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, will take up Southern Health’s chief executive role in November

    18 September 2017 – The trust admits breaching health and safety law in the case of Connor Sparrowhawk

    20 November 2017 – The trust admits breaching health and safety law in the case of Theresa Colvin


‘Before this happened I thought I was immune’

Paramedics are only ever a 999 call away from an experience that could change their lives forever. While some might have the good fortune never to have to respond to an emergency like the Grenfell Tower fire or the Manchester Arena bombing, others will have to live with the consequent mental scarring.

According to the mental health charity Mind, ambulance workers are twice as likely to suffer mental health problems than the general public – but they are also much less likely to reach out for support.

So who is there to help the people who help us at our times of greatest need?

‘I thought it would never affect me’

Father-of-four Dan Farnworth says a 999 call he attended in 2015 completely changed his life.

He had been with North West Ambulance Service since 2004 as an emergency medical technician, but a callout to the scene of a murder of a child hit him hard.

“Before this happened, I thought I was immune to mental health issues – it would never affect me,” the 32-year-old said.

At first he just felt low, but after about 24 hours he realised he was still struggling.

“I couldn’t shake the image of the child.”

Dan found it changed the way he behaved, both at work and with his family, and he suffered nightmares.

He eventually reached out to friend and fellow paramedic Rich Morton – something he says saved his life because it spurred him to get help.

Dan was signed off work for five months with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

You might also be interested in:

The Tube station serving up food for thought

‘I was stalked by a polar bear’

Miscarriage: ‘I just felt like it was my fault’

The friends eventually went on to set up their own charity called Our Blue Light, of which Dan says he is “immensely proud”.

They work to open up discussions about mental health in the emergency services and to make sure people know what to do when a colleague is in mental health crisis.

“It isn’t something you’re taught; we may learn CPR but not what to do when it is a mental health problem – and it is so important.”

He has also worked with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry as part of their Heads Together campaign.

Dan has recently been awarded a Churchill Fellowship, which will fund a trip to the United States and Canada to research a report for Parliament about how their emergency services tackle the issue of mental health.

He said: “I feel quite good at the moment, I have taken a lot of comfort from being able to help other people.

“I’ve also built up my own resilience and have been able to accept that it isn’t always going to be OK. I’m more self-aware, which is a great thing.”

‘We are not superhuman’

“There is this picture I’ve seen of Superman and he’s in the supermarket and he is crying his eyes out,” said 52-year-old Esmail Rifai, a veteran of 27 years with North West Ambulance Service.

“That is how I felt at the time. People see us as superheroes, that we can do anything, but in reality we can go home and, quite often, can have a massive breakdown.”

Two years ago, he had a mental breakdown and spent time off work from his role as a paramedic to receive one-to-one counselling.

He said: “I remember all the horrible jobs to this day. Not just visually; the smell, the taste in my mouth. I think [this is] something everyone from the emergency services will find.

“For me, my breakdown was a combination of lots of different things: the pressures of work, that knock-on effect on your personal life – you can’t help but take things home.”

But shortly after Esmail came back to work, a colleague killed himself. He said he felt “personally at fault”.

“I could have spoken to him, could have helped him. I was upset that he didn’t open up to anybody, or felt he could not open up to anybody.

“I thought, ‘I need to think, I need to do something, to avoid them getting to that stage in life where they feel they have nothing to live for’. It helped me to focus on something.”

Esmail now works for the ambulance service as a clinical safety practitioner and with the charity Mind as one of its Blue Light Champions, promoting its project.

  • How to get information and support on mental health

    He said: “Being involved has also given me some solace. Knowing that I’m helping others in itself makes me feel good, gives me a sense of achievement.

    “There is no shame or stigma attached to experiencing mental health problems – it’s just the same as breaking a bone, except no-one can see that you are suffering.

    “We are not superhuman and we are just as prone to illness as anyone else, if not more.”

    ‘Some calls always remain with you’

    As Jules Lockett points out, it’s not just paramedics who can experience extreme pressure.

    Though she doesn’t work on the front line like some of her colleagues, there is extreme pressure on her in her role at the London Ambulance Service, where she has been employed for 18 years.

    “I think there is always a call, or a handful of calls in your career which always remain with you,” said the 48-year-old, who started out as a call-handler in the emergency control room.

    “You get a response when you can relate it to your nan, your aunty or your uncle. Some of the calls are really distressing: people hanging, or in cardiac arrest. Those calls still stay with me.

    “But they also really make you feel that’s what you are there to do; it isn’t just about giving instructions.”

    The service’s current head of training says she has seen greater pressures on its workers, with the average number of calls reaching 5,000 in a 24-hour period.

    “It is sometimes quite difficult to try and convey the sentiment you want to someone when you are on the phone. You want to put your arm around them and give them a hug and make them better.”

    For Jules, her mental health problems weren’t directly related to her work, but she said it was the support of her ambulance “family” that helped her through it.

    She underwent surgery on her back before joining the service, which brought on a period of depression, and, when she found she needed more surgery about five years ago, she talked it through with her workmates.

    “I think it is important to ask people for support, and sometimes your colleagues will be critical to help get you through the tough times.”

    She said London Ambulance Service has promoted discussion about mental health and provides support in the workplace.

    It offers resilience training, counselling services, a peer support network and has recently set up two quiet zones near the control rooms in Waterloo and Bow, where staff can go when they need time to reflect.

    ‘The nightmares would be horrendous’

    Peter Morgan says his problems came years after he stopped working in the ambulance service.

    He was a paramedic for 10 years, covering Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire, before leaving the service in 2003.

    But when a friend was killed in a road traffic accident about five years later, his mental health went into decline.

    “It would be flashbacks, the nightmares would be horrendous, I would wake up pool of sweat – it was awful,” said Peter, 51, who would go on to be diagnosed with PTSD.

    “The nightmares would start off being memories from the past, jobs I’d been to, then they started to change, almost like something from a horrendous fiction-horror where I would be surrounded by body parts.

    “Totally away from reality, but for me it was extremely real.”

    Peter’s wife Tina was instrumental in realising he needed to get help and approached the Ambulance Staff Charity, which is based in Coventry, not far from their home in Rugby.

    He started therapy and this helped him understand the triggers for his episodes, such as the sound of helicopters or sirens.

    “With the ambulance service, you’ve got anything from a cot death to a road traffic accident; you spend your day going from picking little old Mrs Jones off the floor because she fell over to five people dead in a car crash.

    “It is going from one extreme to another within the space of, like, five hours. For some, it gets to a point where you can’t take it.

    “Nowadays, the emergency services understand what PTSD is. I don’t think anyone did before, and that was a problem.

    “Now there is more awareness and a realisation that every job is loading on a little bit more.”

    Addressing mental health problems within the emergency services is not simply a matter of offering support to those in need, according to Mind’s Blue Light Programme manager Faye McGuinness.

    Part of its work also involves training people to be more aware of the issues colleagues might face.

    “People think it is all trauma-related, but what people have what told us is that organisational factors are impacting more negatively: things like long working hours, shift patterns and the stigma surrounding mental health.

    “We have most definitely have seen a change – we have been quite overwhelmed with the reaction within a group we thought would be difficult to reach.

    “There is definitely still work to do – you don’t see things change overnight – but we are starting to see organisations change the way they view mental health wellbeing.

    “It is a long-term commitment.”