Drew Barrymore declares love for Jake Gyllenhaal

She described him as her “least talented” co-star earlier this week – but now Drew Barrymore wants the world to know she loves Jake Gyllenhaal.

The actress was a guest on James Corden’s Late Late Show when he made her choose between three actors.

She ranked Gyllenhaal third in a segment that requires stars to answer a question – or eat something disgusting.

Now, she has tried to make it up to him by carrying a placard on a red carpet saying: “I heart Jake Gyllenhaal.”

She carried the apparently home-made sign at the premiere of season two of Netflix’s Santa Clarita Diet in Hollywood on Thursday.

That’s despite Corden predicting, incorrectly, before posing the question: “You’re never going to answer this.”

Referring to Gyllenhaal, she said: “I don’t even care if he hates me,” explaining she would be sick if she had to eat the food. “I literally am doing this because I won’t make it.”

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Ant and Dec: Suzuki ends advertising campaign after drink-drive charge

Suzuki has axed TV adverts featuring Ant and Dec after Ant McPartlin was charged with drink driving.

The car firm will still sponsor the last two episodes of the series of ITV’s Saturday Night Takeaway, but the duo will not appear in its commercials.

“No further material featuring the duo will be aired and Suzuki’s endorsement deal with the pair has come to an end,” the company said in a statement.

Mr McPartlin was charged following a collision in London on Sunday.

After his arrest, his publicist said he would be taking time off from his TV commitments “for the foreseeable future” and would seek further treatment.

This weekend’s edition of Saturday Night Takeaway has been cancelled as a result.

  • Ant McPartlin charged with drink driving
  • Ant McPartlin steps down from TV shows and seeks treatment

    The Suzuki statement said: “We agree with ITV and Ant & Dec that it was the correct decision not to broadcast Saturday Night Takeaway this weekend.

    “As a car brand, we recognise the seriousness of Ant’s charge. We completely support Ant’s decision to seek treatment.

    “Suzuki will however continue to sponsor the last two episodes of this series of Saturday Night Takeaway with our current idents.

    “Suzuki very much supports Dec and ITV’s decision to broadcast the shows and as headline sponsors we also want to support the competition winners who have won places on the plane to Florida for the series finale.”

    The final two episodes of the programme, which will air on 31 March and 7 April, will now be presented solo by Declan Donnelly.

    The finale is due to be broadcast live from Universal Orlando Resort in Florida, with 200 fans of the show flying out in a specially-chartered plane.

    Ant & Dec’s Saturday Night Takeaway, which features stunts, sketches and celebrity guests, is presented and produced by the duo. It has won three Baftas, and the pair also won three prizes at this year’s National Television Awards.

    Suzuki’s deal with Ant and Dec saw it sponsor Saturday Night Takeaway, and Takeaway’s production teams and writers also produced ads featuring the duo for Suzuki.

    The two-year deal was signed in December 2015 and was worth an estimated £20m, according to trade publication Campaign.

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Sir Rod Stewart says Sir Elton John’s final tour ‘stinks of selling tickets’

Sir Rod Stewart has given his scathing view on Sir Elton John’s retirement tour, saying it “stinks of selling tickets” and is “not rock and roll”.

Speaking to US chat show host Andy Cohen on Bravo TV, Sir Rod said he did not believe in retirement tours.

“I’ve never spoken about it and if I do retire, I won’t make an announcement. I’ll just fade away,” he said, adding that retirement tours were “dishonest”.

Sir Elton, who announced his farewell tour in February, hasn’t responded.

Sir Rod was responding to a question from a caller on Cohen’s Watch What Happens Live, asking what he thought about his fellow pop legend’s tour.

He responded: “Well I did email her [Sir Elton] and said ‘what, again dear?’ But I didn’t hear anything back.”

  • Elton John ‘to go out with a bang’ on final world tour
  • When does farewell ACTUALLY mean farewell?

    He added that when people made “a big deal” about announcing their retirement, it “stinks of selling tickets”.

    Sir Elton first announced his retirement from performing in 1977. In February, he announced he will finally say goodbye to fans with a series of 300 dates spanning three years.

    “I always thought I was going to be like Ray Charles, BB King – on the road forever,” Sir Elton said.

    “My priorities have changed. We had children and it changed our lives. That doesn’t mean to say I’m not going to be creative. But I’m not going to travel.”

    Sir Elton’s representatives have not responded to a request for comment.

    Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Thrills and chills at Broadway’s Frozen musical

As the musical version of Disney’s hit film Frozen opens on Broadway, reporter Elysa Gardner takes a trip to Arendelle with some excited fans.

On a late winter’s evening in New York City, fans young and old gathered to be transported to an even chillier place.

Their destination, technically speaking, was Times Square, where Disney’s latest stage outing, an adaptation of its 2013 screen musical Frozen – the highest-grossing animated film of all time – was in previews.

But even before the curtain rose inside Broadway’s St James Theatre on 17 March, audience members were ready to suspend disbelief and enter the gates of Arendelle, the fictional kingdom where royal sisters Elsa and Anna grow up and apart and are then reunited – with a little help from an ice salesman, his reindeer and an indomitable snowman.

“I want to see what the characters look like in real life,” said nine-year-old Margaux Knepper, from suburban Long Island.

Gabriel and Grace Stevens, aged 12 and nine respectively, had travelled all the way from Destin, Florida with their parents and were especially eager to see how Sven the reindeer would be recreated onstage.

The puppet design provided for Sven and Olaf the snowman is a highlight of this Frozen, which had its official opening night on Thursday.

Credit for this goes to puppet designer Michael Curry, who previously made magic as Julie Taymor’s collaborator on The Lion King, Disney’s longest-running Broadway hit.

Yet for all the clever design elements involved in the production, it’s the performances, guided with wit and tenderness by acclaimed British director Michael Grandage, that propel the story.

That story is spun by librettist Jennifer Lee, adapting her own screenplay, and composer/lyricists Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez – Academy Award winners both for Frozen and, more recently, Coco.

The journeys of the two spirited young women at the centre of Frozen have both classical elements – Grandage has cited Shakespeare in describing the story’s arc – and aspects that seem freshly topical in the #MeToo era.

Elder sibling Elsa is burdened with the ability to literally freeze her environment – a power that nearly kills her sister in childhood and compels their parents to separate the once inseparable girls and isolate the castle in which they live.

The parents then perish in a storm. (This is Disney after all.) No sooner has Elsa been crowned, however than her strange magic is inadvertently revealed, sending Arendelle into a state of perpetual winter and its young queen fleeing into exile.

Princess Anna bravely follows her, hoping to finally connect with her sister. Meanwhile, a prince who has proposed to Anna on their first meeting organises a search party to rescue her and find Elsa.

The twists that follow – on the off chance you’re not already familiar with them – reference and defy sexist stereotypes. These include the myth – previously shot down in another Broadway musical, the long-popular Wicked – that strong women are more likely to compete with than support one another.

As Elsa, Caissie Levy – a formidable belter whose previous Broadway roles include Wicked’s Elphaba – lends heft and gleam to Frozen’s signature siren call, Let It Go.

She brings the same qualities to the no less turbo-charged Monster, one of several new songs Anderson-Lopez and Lopez have crafted for the show.

Plucky Anna provides more of a comic showcase and may well prove a breakout role for Patti Murin, who is both delightfully playful in her scenes with Kristoff the iceman – charmingly played by Jelani Alladin – and poignant in a darker sequence that introduces fetching new ballad True Love.

Anna is joined in the latter scene by Olaf, who is given just the right goofy sweetness by Greg Hildreth and his accompanying puppet. Revisiting a choice line from the film (“Some people are worth melting for”), Hildreth reaped a well-deserved “awwww” from Saturday’s audience.

Andrew Pirozzi has a more physically demanding task manipulating the more elaborate and expressive puppet designed for Sven. Yet he nonetheless gives the creature a wry soulfulness.

Without speaking a word or singing a note, Pirozzi also factors in some of the show’s funniest moments, nearly upstaging Olaf’s entrance as he slowly manoeuvres the reindeer’s bulky frame around to gawk at the snowman.

Scenic and costume designer Christopher Oram, Grandage’s frequent collaborator, manages the same balance of sprit and spectacle, whether summoning the cultural and spiritual traditions of local townsfolk or bringing us deep into Elsa’s domain.

Natasha Katz’s lighting and Finn Ross’s video design, meanwhile, help evoke a sparkling winter wonderland – occasionally marked by icy spikes that pop up when Elsa’s anger piques.

The spikes were a hit with Teegan Witock, a seven-year-old from Brooklyn, while her 10-year-old sister Anderson cited Elsa’s lightning-fast costume change into a glittering ice-blue gown during Let It Go.

Other audience members got a kick out of Mattea Conforti, the super-perky actress who played Anna as a young girl at Saturday night’s performance.

There was also praise for the graceful Ayla Schwartz, who played young Elsa. (Two actresses alternate in each role.)

To no one’s surprise, the evening ended with a standing ovation, during which Margaux Knepper and her friend Phoebe Talamas, also nine, scooted down the aisle to get a closer look at the players.

They were real all right, and both girls no doubt walked back into the frosty night air feeling a little warmer inside.

Frozen continues at New York’s St James Theatre. A UK production has yet to be confirmed.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Thrills and chills at Broadway’s Frozen musical

As the musical version of Disney’s hit film Frozen opens on Broadway, reporter Elysa Gardner takes a trip to Arendelle with some excited fans.

On a late winter’s evening in New York City, fans young and old gathered to be transported to an even chillier place.

Their destination, technically speaking, was Times Square, where Disney’s latest stage outing, an adaptation of its 2013 screen musical Frozen – the highest-grossing animated film of all time – was in previews.

But even before the curtain rose inside Broadway’s St James Theatre on 17 March, audience members were ready to suspend disbelief and enter the gates of Arendelle, the fictional kingdom where royal sisters Elsa and Anna grow up and apart and are then reunited – with a little help from an ice salesman, his reindeer and an indomitable snowman.

“I want to see what the characters look like in real life,” said nine-year-old Margaux Knepper, from suburban Long Island.

Gabriel and Grace Stevens, aged 12 and nine respectively, had travelled all the way from Destin, Florida with their parents and were especially eager to see how Sven the reindeer would be recreated onstage.

The puppet design provided for Sven and Olaf the snowman is a highlight of this Frozen, which had its official opening night on Thursday.

Credit for this goes to puppet designer Michael Curry, who previously made magic as Julie Taymor’s collaborator on The Lion King, Disney’s longest-running Broadway hit.

Yet for all the clever design elements involved in the production, it’s the performances, guided with wit and tenderness by acclaimed British director Michael Grandage, that propel the story.

That story is spun by librettist Jennifer Lee, adapting her own screenplay, and composer/lyricists Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez – Academy Award winners both for Frozen and, more recently, Coco.

The journeys of the two spirited young women at the centre of Frozen have both classical elements – Grandage has cited Shakespeare in describing the story’s arc – and aspects that seem freshly topical in the #MeToo era.

Elder sibling Elsa is burdened with the ability to literally freeze her environment – a power that nearly kills her sister in childhood and compels their parents to separate the once inseparable girls and isolate the castle in which they live.

The parents then perish in a storm. (This is Disney after all.) No sooner has Elsa been crowned, however than her strange magic is inadvertently revealed, sending Arendelle into a state of perpetual winter and its young queen fleeing into exile.

Princess Anna bravely follows her, hoping to finally connect with her sister. Meanwhile, a prince who has proposed to Anna on their first meeting organises a search party to rescue her and find Elsa.

The twists that follow – on the off chance you’re not already familiar with them – reference and defy sexist stereotypes. These include the myth – previously shot down in another Broadway musical, the long-popular Wicked – that strong women are more likely to compete with than support one another.

As Elsa, Caissie Levy – a formidable belter whose previous Broadway roles include Wicked’s Elphaba – lends heft and gleam to Frozen’s signature siren call, Let It Go.

She brings the same qualities to the no less turbo-charged Monster, one of several new songs Anderson-Lopez and Lopez have crafted for the show.

Plucky Anna provides more of a comic showcase and may well prove a breakout role for Patti Murin, who is both delightfully playful in her scenes with Kristoff the iceman – charmingly played by Jelani Alladin – and poignant in a darker sequence that introduces fetching new ballad True Love.

Anna is joined in the latter scene by Olaf, who is given just the right goofy sweetness by Greg Hildreth and his accompanying puppet. Revisiting a choice line from the film (“Some people are worth melting for”), Hildreth reaped a well-deserved “awwww” from Saturday’s audience.

Andrew Pirozzi has a more physically demanding task manipulating the more elaborate and expressive puppet designed for Sven. Yet he nonetheless gives the creature a wry soulfulness.

Without speaking a word or singing a note, Pirozzi also factors in some of the show’s funniest moments, nearly upstaging Olaf’s entrance as he slowly manoeuvres the reindeer’s bulky frame around to gawk at the snowman.

Scenic and costume designer Christopher Oram, Grandage’s frequent collaborator, manages the same balance of sprit and spectacle, whether summoning the cultural and spiritual traditions of local townsfolk or bringing us deep into Elsa’s domain.

Natasha Katz’s lighting and Finn Ross’s video design, meanwhile, help evoke a sparkling winter wonderland – occasionally marked by icy spikes that pop up when Elsa’s anger piques.

The spikes were a hit with Teegan Witock, a seven-year-old from Brooklyn, while her 10-year-old sister Anderson cited Elsa’s lightning-fast costume change into a glittering ice-blue gown during Let It Go.

Other audience members got a kick out of Mattea Conforti, the super-perky actress who played Anna as a young girl at Saturday night’s performance.

There was also praise for the graceful Ayla Schwartz, who played young Elsa. (Two actresses alternate in each role.)

To no one’s surprise, the evening ended with a standing ovation, during which Margaux Knepper and her friend Phoebe Talamas, also nine, scooted down the aisle to get a closer look at the players.

They were real all right, and both girls no doubt walked back into the frosty night air feeling a little warmer inside.

Frozen continues at New York’s St James Theatre. A UK production has yet to be confirmed.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Spot the difference – Damien Hirst’s new vision

His art is celebrated and derided in equal measure. But Damien Hirst is in no doubt about his talent – and for good reason.

“If I put it in a skip outside a pub, would someone take it home? And you think, ‘yeah, they would.’ If it’s good, it won’t get left in the street.

“I think that’s a good way of working out if a painting’s good or not.”

One of Britain’s most controversial artists, Hirst, 52, is famous for making a fortune, pickled sharks and a skull covered in more than 8,000 diamonds.

He picked up the Turner Prize along the way in 1995.

Now he is taking over the spectacular gilded state rooms of Houghton Hall in Norfolk, to show a series of paintings which have never been seen in public before.

Hirst has removed 45 Old Master paintings by artists including Thomas Gainsborough and Sir Joshua Reynolds from the walls of the Palladian mansion and replaced them with what he has called his “Colour Space” paintings.

They are a new body of work based on the Spot Paintings which made his name in the 1980s – and are among his most recognised works.

Back then, he says, he wanted the spots to be uniform and “to make them look like they were made by machine, not a person.”

Now that has changed.

“After 25 years of paintings spots perfectly they felt like me when I was in my 20s. But now I’m in my 50s, I don’t feel as attached to them in the same way.”

So the Colour Space pictures are less uniform and more higgledy-piggledy.

“It’s messy and it’s kind of annoying and there’s drips and there’s dribbles,” he explains.

“Maybe because I’m getting older and I’m starting to get a bit drooly, a bit dribbly like these paintings,” he adds.

Hirst says he has painted “bits” on all of the paintings in the exhibition. But nothing more.

He famously employs a team of assistants to produce his art, working “almost like a factory.”

But he defends his approach.

‘I’m impatient’

“Everybody goes, did you actually paint them? I don’t know why that’s important in art.

“If you live in a Frank Gehry house, it’s not important to you that he laid the bricks.

“And I see myself more like a kind of architect in the way that I make things, than a painter, even if I’m making paintings.”

He explains: “Since the very beginning I’ve always delegated anything that I can. I always want to find shortcuts to get what I want.

“I’m impatient, so if I can get other people to make them, I will do that.”

Hirst says he has got a “fair bit” of his work on display in his own home. But it is not always welcome.

He remembers giving his young son a Spot Painting to hang in his bedroom.

“When he turned 10, I said: ‘You can have anything you want from our art collection.'”

His response: “Can I not have the Spot Painting? Can I have a Banksy?”

Damien Hirst at Houghton Hall: Colour Space Paintings and Outdoor Sculptures is on display from 25 March – 15 July.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Spot the difference – Damien Hirst’s new vision

His art is celebrated and derided in equal measure. But Damien Hirst is in no doubt about his talent – and for good reason.

“If I put it in a skip outside a pub, would someone take it home? And you think, ‘yeah, they would.’ If it’s good, it won’t get left in the street.

“I think that’s a good way of working out if a painting’s good or not.”

One of Britain’s most controversial artists, Hirst, 52, is famous for making a fortune, pickled sharks and a skull covered in more than 8,000 diamonds.

He picked up the Turner Prize along the way in 1995.

Now he is taking over the spectacular gilded state rooms of Houghton Hall in Norfolk, to show a series of paintings which have never been seen in public before.

Hirst has removed 45 Old Master paintings by artists including Thomas Gainsborough and Sir Joshua Reynolds from the walls of the Palladian mansion and replaced them with what he has called his “Colour Space” paintings.

They are a new body of work based on the Spot Paintings which made his name in the 1980s – and are among his most recognised works.

Back then, he says, he wanted the spots to be uniform and “to make them look like they were made by machine, not a person.”

Now that has changed.

“After 25 years of paintings spots perfectly they felt like me when I was in my 20s. But now I’m in my 50s, I don’t feel as attached to them in the same way.”

So the Colour Space pictures are less uniform and more higgledy-piggledy.

“It’s messy and it’s kind of annoying and there’s drips and there’s dribbles,” he explains.

“Maybe because I’m getting older and I’m starting to get a bit drooly, a bit dribbly like these paintings,” he adds.

Hirst says he has painted “bits” on all of the paintings in the exhibition. But nothing more.

He famously employs a team of assistants to produce his art, working “almost like a factory.”

But he defends his approach.

‘I’m impatient’

“Everybody goes, did you actually paint them? I don’t know why that’s important in art.

“If you live in a Frank Gehry house, it’s not important to you that he laid the bricks.

“And I see myself more like a kind of architect in the way that I make things, than a painter, even if I’m making paintings.”

He explains: “Since the very beginning I’ve always delegated anything that I can. I always want to find shortcuts to get what I want.

“I’m impatient, so if I can get other people to make them, I will do that.”

Hirst says he has got a “fair bit” of his work on display in his own home. But it is not always welcome.

He remembers giving his young son a Spot Painting to hang in his bedroom.

“When he turned 10, I said: ‘You can have anything you want from our art collection.'”

His response: “Can I not have the Spot Painting? Can I have a Banksy?”

Damien Hirst at Houghton Hall: Colour Space Paintings and Outdoor Sculptures is on display from 25 March – 15 July.

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Generation Game returns for Easter treat

“A food blender, a toaster, a cuddly toy!” Classic 1970s game show The Generation Game is back with former Bake Off stars Mel and Sue at the helm.

Originally hosted by Sir Bruce Forsyth, and later by Larry Grayson and Jim Davidson, the first of two episodes will be shown on Easter Sunday.

The latest revival will feature guest stars including Basil Brush – along with the conveyor belt, of course.

The BBC One show will combine aspects of the original series with new games.

If you’re too young to remember, here’s what to expect:

Contestants – four families – compete in a series of challenges, often helped by star guests.

Classic challenges which have been retained include cake icing, pottery and plate spinning. And sausage-making.

A few more modern tasks have been added this time round, such as Bollywood dancing.

Quiz show host Richard Osman, TV presenter Lorraine Kelly, Johnny Vegas and Danny Dyer will be making appearances alongside some other surprise special guests.

But what you really need to know about is the conveyor belt – so, one or two members of the winning team watch prizes pass on a conveyor belt and win as many as they can recall once all the prizes have gone past.

Episodes cut

Prizes generally included household items like kettles, toasters and that 70s classic – the fondue set. But there was always a cuddly toy featured, which was a firm favourite with younger members of the audience.

The date of the second episode has not yet been confirmed.

When the vintage game show’s return was announced last year, the BBC said it would have a four-episode run.

“During the production process it’s not unusual for a new series to change length as the format evolves,” said the BBC in a statement.

“We’ve got a brilliant show for audiences on BBC One this spring.”

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Generation Game returns for Easter treat

“A food blender, a toaster, a cuddly toy!” Classic 1970s game show The Generation Game is back with former Bake Off stars Mel and Sue at the helm.

Originally hosted by Sir Bruce Forsyth, and later by Larry Grayson and Jim Davidson, the first of two episodes will be shown on Easter Sunday.

The latest revival will feature guest stars including Basil Brush – along with the conveyor belt, of course.

The BBC One show will combine aspects of the original series with new games.

If you’re too young to remember, here’s what to expect:

Contestants – four families – compete in a series of challenges, often helped by star guests.

Classic challenges which have been retained include cake icing, pottery and plate spinning. And sausage-making.

A few more modern tasks have been added this time round, such as Bollywood dancing.

Quiz show host Richard Osman, TV presenter Lorraine Kelly, Johnny Vegas and Danny Dyer will be making appearances alongside some other surprise special guests.

But what you really need to know about is the conveyor belt – so, one or two members of the winning team watch prizes pass on a conveyor belt and win as many as they can recall once all the prizes have gone past.

Episodes cut

Prizes generally included household items like kettles, toasters and that 70s classic – the fondue set. But there was always a cuddly toy featured, which was a firm favourite with younger members of the audience.

The date of the second episode has not yet been confirmed.

When the vintage game show’s return was announced last year, the BBC said it would have a four-episode run.

“During the production process it’s not unusual for a new series to change length as the format evolves,” said the BBC in a statement.

“We’ve got a brilliant show for audiences on BBC One this spring.”

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Cynthia Nixon and 10 other celebrities who entered politics

Sex and the City actress Cynthia Nixon announced on Monday she will run for governor of New York, challenging incumbent Andrew Cuomo for the Democratic nomination.

It follows the announcement last month that Clueless actress Stacey Dash is running for congress in California on a Republican ticket.

Plenty of famous faces have campaigned for candidates in the past – but why do so many celebrities decide to enter politics themselves?

“The facts show that people like Ronald Reagan and Donald Trump have had great success in politics,” says Dr Sharon Coen, senior lecturer in media psychology at the University of Salford.

“If they are already in the public eye, they are already present on people’s radar – we feel like we’re friends with them, or a version of them.

“This increases the feelings of likeability, familiarity and trust – which are all key factors that are determinant in the success of a political candidate.”

In addition, Dr Coen says the backgrounds of many actors and celebrities in performance make them particularly suited to the political sphere.

“These individuals are trained to communicate effectively with audiences. And research shows non-verbal skills are just as important, when it comes to voters, as what people actually say.”

Another key factor is already being in the limelight. “Politicians frequently say they feel like they are under siege by the media,” Dr Coen explains.

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    “This means normal people who may have the calling to go into politics, who actually care about society, and who want to make a change are discouraged by this.

    “What stops them is the toll that they – and the people close to them – would have to pay. Celebrities already know how to deal with this and have developed strategies to help them cope. I sincerely believe politicians should have training in this area too.”

    Many celebrities who don’t necessarily become politicians themselves are often keen to make their political beliefs known, sometimes by actively campaigning for a particular candidate.

    Katy Perry and Beyonce were among those to openly back Hillary Clinton during the US presidential election of 2016.

    But Matteo Bergamini, from the political advocacy Shout Out UK, argues that relying on celebrities to make politics more “attractive” to young people is a “tired trope”.

    Writing for the Huffington Post, he claims it “perpetuates the myth that young people are simply not interested enough in their own futures to get involved unless someone wraps it up in a shiny bow. Surely our young people deserve more credit than that?”

    So, is it a good idea for celebrities to dabble in politics, and how many have managed to make the transition?

    Here are just some of the celebrities who have turned their hand to politics – some more successfully than others…


    1. Arnold Schwarzenegger

    Famous for:

    The young Austrian bodybuilder won Mr Universe, aged just 20. He went on to star in numerous films – most famously the Terminator franchise.

    Career in politics:

    Was elected Governor of California in 2003, serving two terms.

    Nickname:

    Arnie, The Governator.


    2. Katie Price

    Famous for:

    Her surgically-enhanced glamour modelling career. Her numerous marriages. Being a best-selling author. Coming runner-up in the selection process to represent the UK at the 2005 Eurovision Song Contest. Her outspoken comments on just about everything.

    Career in politics:

    She pledged free plastic surgery for all, more nudist beaches and a ban on parking tickets in her campaign as an independent candidate in the Manchester seat of Stretford and Urmston in 2001.

    Despite promising “a bigger, betta [sic] future”, Ms Price won just 713 votes and lost her deposit.

    Key quote:

    “I know it will take a big swing but there’s no bigger swinger than me,” said Price in 2001.


    3. Manny Pacquiao

    Famous for:

    World champion boxer who won 11 major world titles – and the first in history to do so across four weight classes of boxing: flyweight, featherweight, lightweight and welterweight.

    Career in politics:

    Pacquiao was elected to the Philippines House of Representatives in 2010. In 2016 he was elected as a senator.

    Nickname:

    Pac Man, The Destroyer.


    4. Ronald Reagan

    Famous for:

    Film actor who starred in westerns, including Santa Fe Trail with Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, and the Oscar-nominated King’s Row.

    Career in politics:

    Hollywood actor Reagan went on to serve first as governor of California and then as US president from 1981 to 1989.

    Nickname:

    The Great Communicator. His Secret Service codename was “Raw Hide”.


    5. Glenda Jackson

    Famous for:

    Jackson won two best actress Oscars over a 30-year career for Women in Love and A Touch of Class. She also received an Emmy for the TV drama Elizabeth R.

    Career in politics:

    Elected Labour MP for Hampstead and Highgate in 1992, she became a junior minister in Tony Blair’s 1997 government. Jackson stood down at the 2015 election, saying it was time for someone else to have a turn – and declared she would return to acting.

    Key quote:

    “The important thing in acting is to be able to laugh and cry. If I have to laugh, I think of my sex life. If I have to cry, I think of my sex life.”


    6. Al Murray

    Famous for:

    Being a regular on the stand-up and television satire circuits. Murray’s outspoken character The Pub Landlord was featured in many comedy sketch shows before the British comedian landed his own chat show, Al Murray’s Happy Hour.

    Career in politics:

    Murray announced he would run in the 2015 election in the South Thanet constituency – the same seat being contested by UKIP leader Nigel Farage. He won just 318 votes.

    Key quote:

    “It seems to me that the UK is ready for a bloke waving a pint around, offering commonsense solutions.”


    7. Imran Khan

    Famous for:

    Being a Test cricket fast bowler for Pakistan. In 1992 Khan led his team to victory in the Cricket World Cup, defeating England – it’s the only time Pakistan has won the competition. He’s also known for marrying socialite Jemima Goldsmith.

    Career in politics:

    In 1996, Khan founded the political party PTI in Pakistan.

    He was defeated in the 2013 elections, but Khan says he still wants to fulfil his ambition of becoming Pakistan’s next prime minister following parliamentary elections, due in July this year.

    Nickname:

    The Lion of Lahore.

    8. Wyclef Jean

    Famous for:

    The Haitian rapper/singer/producer won three Grammys as part of hip-hop group The Fugees. He went on to have a successful solo career.

    Career in politics:

    In 2010, after helping with the earthquake relief effort, Wyclef formally filed papers as a candidate for the Haitian presidential election.

    He was disqualified, however, after it emerged he did not fulfil the residency requirement of living in the country for five years before the election.

    Key quote:

    “It was important that I became successful. People say they do it for the love, and yes, you do it for the love, but you want to be successful.”

    9. Shirley Temple

    Famous for:

    Finding international fame, at the age of seven, in Bright Eyes and becoming the first child star to be honoured with a miniature Juvenile Oscar for her film accomplishments in 1935.

    Career in politics:

    The actress ran unsuccessfully for congress in 1967. She was appointed US ambassador to Ghana in 1974 and to Czechoslovakia in 1989.

    Key quote:

    “I stopped believing in Santa Claus when I was six. Mother took me to see him in a department store and he asked for my autograph.”


    And of course not forgetting…

    10. Donald Trump

    Famous for:

    Firing dozens of unsuccessful candidates in the US version of The Apprentice. Golf courses. Trump University.

    Career in politics:

    Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States of America without any prior political qualification.

    Nicknames used by him:

    Crooked Hillary – Hillary Clinton. Rocket Man – Kim Jong-un. Pocahontas – US senator Elizabeth Warren.


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