Generation Game returns for Easter treat

“A food blender, a toaster, a cuddly toy!” Classic 1970s game show The Generation Game is back with former Bake Off stars Mel and Sue at the helm.

Originally hosted by Sir Bruce Forsyth, and later by Larry Grayson and Jim Davidson, the first of two episodes will be shown on Easter Sunday.

The latest revival will feature guest stars including Basil Brush – along with the conveyor belt, of course.

The BBC One show will combine aspects of the original series with new games.

If you’re too young to remember, here’s what to expect:

Contestants – four families – compete in a series of challenges, often helped by star guests.

Classic challenges which have been retained include cake icing, pottery and plate spinning. And sausage-making.

A few more modern tasks have been added this time round, such as Bollywood dancing.

Quiz show host Richard Osman, TV presenter Lorraine Kelly, Johnny Vegas and Danny Dyer will be making appearances alongside some other surprise special guests.

But what you really need to know about is the conveyor belt – so, one or two members of the winning team watch prizes pass on a conveyor belt and win as many as they can recall once all the prizes have gone past.

Episodes cut

Prizes generally included household items like kettles, toasters and that 70s classic – the fondue set. But there was always a cuddly toy featured, which was a firm favourite with younger members of the audience.

The date of the second episode has not yet been confirmed.

When the vintage game show’s return was announced last year, the BBC said it would have a four-episode run.

“During the production process it’s not unusual for a new series to change length as the format evolves,” said the BBC in a statement.

“We’ve got a brilliant show for audiences on BBC One this spring.”

Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

PornHub greets bloggers after YouTube gun ban introduced

YouTube has banned videos that show people how to manufacture or modify guns and their accessories.

It had already banned videos linked to the sale of guns and accessories.

Many firearms enthusiasts noticed that some of their videos had been removed from the video-sharing website and some had their channels suspended.

Prominent gun video-bloggers said the move was an erosion of US citizens’ rights, and some said they would move their content to PornHub instead.

YouTube’s policies now prohibit videos that:

  • show how to make a firearm, ammunition, high-capacity magazine or homemade silencers
  • are designed to sell guns or specific accessories including high-capacity magazines and tools that convert a firearm to automatic fire
  • show how to convert a firearm to automatic or simulated-automatic fire
  • show how to install such accessories or modifications

    The changes will fully take effect on 20 April.

    The decision was met with anger from some videomakers who modify guns and show off their creations as a hobby.

    Karl Kasarda and Ian McCollum, who run the gun review site InRangeTV, said they had started posting their videos on Facebook and pornography site PornHub.

    “We will not be seeking any monetisation from PornHub… we are merely looking for a safe harbour for our content and for our viewers,” the pair said in a statement.

    Firearms manufacturer Spike’s Tactical said the change reflected attempts to “slowly chip away at our freedoms and erode our rights”.

    Videomaker Joerg Sprave said he appreciated YouTube was “now defining their guidelines” more clearly.

    But he said the change had been introduced without a transitional period.

    “Many gun channels must now be afraid,” he told news site Motherboard.

    “They should at least get some time to clean up their videos so the new rules are kept.”

    Unsuitable for children

    On Tuesday, YouTube was criticised after the Sun newspaper found step-by-step instructions on how to build an air rifle on YouTube Kids, the company’s app for children.

    Despite being designed for children, its content is curated by algorithms. Inappropriate videos have repeatedly slipped through the net.

    In February, the BBC’s Newsround programme found instructions on how to sharpen knives on YouTube Kids.

    At the time, YouTube said it had a variety of processes in place to try to prevent inappropriate material appearing on its platforms.

‘Radical change’ needed on countryside

The UK government is failing rural communities and the natural environment, a report says.

The Lords Select Committee document says there should be radical change in how the countryside is looked after.

It recommends stripping the environment department Defra of its power to regulate on rural affairs, and reforming the Countryside Code.

The Lords said Defra had focused too much on farming and agriculture, rather than other aspects of rural life.

The report describes a “consistent failure, over a number of years, to prioritise the ‘rural affairs’ element” of the remit of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra).

All this, it says, has had a “profound negative impact … to the cost of us all”.

The Select Committee on the Natural Environment and Rural Communities (NERC) Act 2006 recommends that responsibility for rural affairs should transfer to the Ministry of Housing, Communities, and Local Government.

According to the report, the body responsible for conserving the natural environment and promoting public access to the land, Natural England (NE), has been “hollowed out” and is now largely ineffective.

The report’s chairman, Lord Cameron of Dillington, said: “The last major research was done by the Commission for Social Mobility last year, and it said some of the worst spots for deprivation and intergenerational poverty exists in rural England.

“That it’s as bad as if not worse than our inner cities. We feel they have been neglected by government, that Defra is not doing a good job and that changes need to be made.”

Budgets slashed

Severe budget cuts and the abolition of the Rural Communities Policy Unit means that NE no longer has the budget or power to effectively and independently regulate government policy. It also means that not enough is being done to promote responsible access to the countryside.

Taking advice from the National Farmers Union, it says that the Countryside Code should be re-launched, so more people are aware of how to properly enjoy rural areas.

This code was designed as a standard set of guidelines for members of the public, to ensure respect and enjoyment in the countryside.

A Defra spokesperson said: “Whether it is developing a new agricultural system outside the EU or safeguarding our countryside, the needs of our rural communities sit at the heart of everything we do.”

“We are continuing to champion rural affairs across government – driving forward high-speed broadband in the most hard to reach areas, increasing housing availability and supporting the creation of more than 6,000 jobs through our dedicated fund for rural businesses.”

Some people living in rural areas see a role for the community too. Justin Dyson, a resident of Croyde in Devon, volunteers at a local centre for the elderly.

“Life isn’t great here for old people because public transport is terrible and they’re alone a lot. But I think it’s up to us to help – it’s not all down to the government. We need to take responsibility,” he told BBC News.

Improving access

The Lords committee also considered concerns over the long-term funding and sustainability of the National Trails Network.

In a measure also proposed by the Environment Secretary Michael Gove, the committee recommends that a post-Brexit subsidy system should give public money to landowners who maintain footpaths and allow more access to their land.

It also suggests that National Trails could be sponsored, calling for Defra to work with the ramblers and other organisations to develop proposals for long-term management and maintenance funding.

Stephen Russell from the Ramblers Association said that Natural England had been being “hamstrung” by budget cuts: “The path network, the trails themselves, they benefit so many people: people’s health, their well-being, the local economies. It’s too important to not address, because of all the different benefits that they bring.”

“We ran a survey in 2015 that pointed to a path network that was generally in good condition but with maybe 10% of the network classed as impassable, and an additional 40% that was in need of improvement.”

The committee also highlights concerns over the provision of rural housing, saying Natural England has “insufficient regard for landscapes”, when offering planning guidance.

Lauren Kielb, a resident in Bradford on Avon told the BBC there wasn’t enough attention paid to planning in rural towns:

“We’ve got lots of new housing coming here in Bradford on Avon and I’m worried about what the impact will be,” she said. “The school here is getting larger so it will alienate the local villages from having access to that secondary school. They will become cut off from it.”

In addition, the Lords committee report says the requirement for public authorities to “have regard” to biodiversity when exercising their functions is ineffective.

The report recommends the NERC Act should be amended in order to add a reporting requirement to the duty and the government should also consider strengthening the wording.

Follow Claire on Twitter.

‘Radical change’ needed on countryside

The UK government is failing rural communities and the natural environment, a report says.

The Lords Select Committee document says there should be radical change in how the countryside is looked after.

It recommends stripping the environment department Defra of its power to regulate on rural affairs, and reforming the Countryside Code.

The Lords said Defra had focused too much on farming and agriculture, rather than other aspects of rural life.

The report describes a “consistent failure, over a number of years, to prioritise the ‘rural affairs’ element” of the remit of the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra).

All this, it says, has had a “profound negative impact … to the cost of us all”.

The Select Committee on the Natural Environment and Rural Communities (NERC) Act 2006 recommends that responsibility for rural affairs should transfer to the Ministry of Housing, Communities, and Local Government.

According to the report, the body responsible for conserving the natural environment and promoting public access to the land, Natural England (NE), has been “hollowed out” and is now largely ineffective.

The report’s chairman, Lord Cameron of Dillington, said: “The last major research was done by the Commission for Social Mobility last year, and it said some of the worst spots for deprivation and intergenerational poverty exists in rural England.

“That it’s as bad as if not worse than our inner cities. We feel they have been neglected by government, that Defra is not doing a good job and that changes need to be made.”

Budgets slashed

Severe budget cuts and the abolition of the Rural Communities Policy Unit means that NE no longer has the budget or power to effectively and independently regulate government policy. It also means that not enough is being done to promote responsible access to the countryside.

Taking advice from the National Farmers Union, it says that the Countryside Code should be re-launched, so more people are aware of how to properly enjoy rural areas.

This code was designed as a standard set of guidelines for members of the public, to ensure respect and enjoyment in the countryside.

A Defra spokesperson said: “Whether it is developing a new agricultural system outside the EU or safeguarding our countryside, the needs of our rural communities sit at the heart of everything we do.”

“We are continuing to champion rural affairs across government – driving forward high-speed broadband in the most hard to reach areas, increasing housing availability and supporting the creation of more than 6,000 jobs through our dedicated fund for rural businesses.”

Some people living in rural areas see a role for the community too. Justin Dyson, a resident of Croyde in Devon, volunteers at a local centre for the elderly.

“Life isn’t great here for old people because public transport is terrible and they’re alone a lot. But I think it’s up to us to help – it’s not all down to the government. We need to take responsibility,” he told BBC News.

Improving access

The Lords committee also considered concerns over the long-term funding and sustainability of the National Trails Network.

In a measure also proposed by the Environment Secretary Michael Gove, the committee recommends that a post-Brexit subsidy system should give public money to landowners who maintain footpaths and allow more access to their land.

It also suggests that National Trails could be sponsored, calling for Defra to work with the ramblers and other organisations to develop proposals for long-term management and maintenance funding.

Stephen Russell from the Ramblers Association said that Natural England had been being “hamstrung” by budget cuts: “The path network, the trails themselves, they benefit so many people: people’s health, their well-being, the local economies. It’s too important to not address, because of all the different benefits that they bring.”

“We ran a survey in 2015 that pointed to a path network that was generally in good condition but with maybe 10% of the network classed as impassable, and an additional 40% that was in need of improvement.”

The committee also highlights concerns over the provision of rural housing, saying Natural England has “insufficient regard for landscapes”, when offering planning guidance.

Lauren Kielb, a resident in Bradford on Avon told the BBC there wasn’t enough attention paid to planning in rural towns:

“We’ve got lots of new housing coming here in Bradford on Avon and I’m worried about what the impact will be,” she said. “The school here is getting larger so it will alienate the local villages from having access to that secondary school. They will become cut off from it.”

In addition, the Lords committee report says the requirement for public authorities to “have regard” to biodiversity when exercising their functions is ineffective.

The report recommends the NERC Act should be amended in order to add a reporting requirement to the duty and the government should also consider strengthening the wording.

Follow Claire on Twitter.

Cynthia Nixon and 10 other celebrities who entered politics

Sex and the City actress Cynthia Nixon announced on Monday she will run for governor of New York, challenging incumbent Andrew Cuomo for the Democratic nomination.

It follows the announcement last month that Clueless actress Stacey Dash is running for congress in California on a Republican ticket.

Plenty of famous faces have campaigned for candidates in the past – but why do so many celebrities decide to enter politics themselves?

“The facts show that people like Ronald Reagan and Donald Trump have had great success in politics,” says Dr Sharon Coen, senior lecturer in media psychology at the University of Salford.

“If they are already in the public eye, they are already present on people’s radar – we feel like we’re friends with them, or a version of them.

“This increases the feelings of likeability, familiarity and trust – which are all key factors that are determinant in the success of a political candidate.”

In addition, Dr Coen says the backgrounds of many actors and celebrities in performance make them particularly suited to the political sphere.

“These individuals are trained to communicate effectively with audiences. And research shows non-verbal skills are just as important, when it comes to voters, as what people actually say.”

Another key factor is already being in the limelight. “Politicians frequently say they feel like they are under siege by the media,” Dr Coen explains.

  • Celebrity support in UK and US election campaigns
  • Oprah not interested in presidential bid
  • Celebs and politics: It rarely works

    “This means normal people who may have the calling to go into politics, who actually care about society, and who want to make a change are discouraged by this.

    “What stops them is the toll that they – and the people close to them – would have to pay. Celebrities already know how to deal with this and have developed strategies to help them cope. I sincerely believe politicians should have training in this area too.”

    Many celebrities who don’t necessarily become politicians themselves are often keen to make their political beliefs known, sometimes by actively campaigning for a particular candidate.

    Katy Perry and Beyonce were among those to openly back Hillary Clinton during the US presidential election of 2016.

    But Matteo Bergamini, from the political advocacy Shout Out UK, argues that relying on celebrities to make politics more “attractive” to young people is a “tired trope”.

    Writing for the Huffington Post, he claims it “perpetuates the myth that young people are simply not interested enough in their own futures to get involved unless someone wraps it up in a shiny bow. Surely our young people deserve more credit than that?”

    So, is it a good idea for celebrities to dabble in politics, and how many have managed to make the transition?

    Here are just some of the celebrities who have turned their hand to politics – some more successfully than others…


    1. Arnold Schwarzenegger

    Famous for:

    The young Austrian bodybuilder won Mr Universe, aged just 20. He went on to star in numerous films – most famously the Terminator franchise.

    Career in politics:

    Was elected Governor of California in 2003, serving two terms.

    Nickname:

    Arnie, The Governator.


    2. Katie Price

    Famous for:

    Her surgically-enhanced glamour modelling career. Her numerous marriages. Being a best-selling author. Coming runner-up in the selection process to represent the UK at the 2005 Eurovision Song Contest. Her outspoken comments on just about everything.

    Career in politics:

    She pledged free plastic surgery for all, more nudist beaches and a ban on parking tickets in her campaign as an independent candidate in the Manchester seat of Stretford and Urmston in 2001.

    Despite promising “a bigger, betta [sic] future”, Ms Price won just 713 votes and lost her deposit.

    Key quote:

    “I know it will take a big swing but there’s no bigger swinger than me,” said Price in 2001.


    3. Manny Pacquiao

    Famous for:

    World champion boxer who won 11 major world titles – and the first in history to do so across four weight classes of boxing: flyweight, featherweight, lightweight and welterweight.

    Career in politics:

    Pacquiao was elected to the Philippines House of Representatives in 2010. In 2016 he was elected as a senator.

    Nickname:

    Pac Man, The Destroyer.


    4. Ronald Reagan

    Famous for:

    Film actor who starred in westerns, including Santa Fe Trail with Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, and the Oscar-nominated King’s Row.

    Career in politics:

    Hollywood actor Reagan went on to serve first as governor of California and then as US president from 1981 to 1989.

    Nickname:

    The Great Communicator. His Secret Service codename was “Raw Hide”.


    5. Glenda Jackson

    Famous for:

    Jackson won two best actress Oscars over a 30-year career for Women in Love and A Touch of Class. She also received an Emmy for the TV drama Elizabeth R.

    Career in politics:

    Elected Labour MP for Hampstead and Highgate in 1992, she became a junior minister in Tony Blair’s 1997 government. Jackson stood down at the 2015 election, saying it was time for someone else to have a turn – and declared she would return to acting.

    Key quote:

    “The important thing in acting is to be able to laugh and cry. If I have to laugh, I think of my sex life. If I have to cry, I think of my sex life.”


    6. Al Murray

    Famous for:

    Being a regular on the stand-up and television satire circuits. Murray’s outspoken character The Pub Landlord was featured in many comedy sketch shows before the British comedian landed his own chat show, Al Murray’s Happy Hour.

    Career in politics:

    Murray announced he would run in the 2015 election in the South Thanet constituency – the same seat being contested by UKIP leader Nigel Farage. He won just 318 votes.

    Key quote:

    “It seems to me that the UK is ready for a bloke waving a pint around, offering commonsense solutions.”


    7. Imran Khan

    Famous for:

    Being a Test cricket fast bowler for Pakistan. In 1992 Khan led his team to victory in the Cricket World Cup, defeating England – it’s the only time Pakistan has won the competition. He’s also known for marrying socialite Jemima Goldsmith.

    Career in politics:

    In 1996, Khan founded the political party PTI in Pakistan.

    He was defeated in the 2013 elections, but Khan says he still wants to fulfil his ambition of becoming Pakistan’s next prime minister following parliamentary elections, due in July this year.

    Nickname:

    The Lion of Lahore.

    8. Wyclef Jean

    Famous for:

    The Haitian rapper/singer/producer won three Grammys as part of hip-hop group The Fugees. He went on to have a successful solo career.

    Career in politics:

    In 2010, after helping with the earthquake relief effort, Wyclef formally filed papers as a candidate for the Haitian presidential election.

    He was disqualified, however, after it emerged he did not fulfil the residency requirement of living in the country for five years before the election.

    Key quote:

    “It was important that I became successful. People say they do it for the love, and yes, you do it for the love, but you want to be successful.”

    9. Shirley Temple

    Famous for:

    Finding international fame, at the age of seven, in Bright Eyes and becoming the first child star to be honoured with a miniature Juvenile Oscar for her film accomplishments in 1935.

    Career in politics:

    The actress ran unsuccessfully for congress in 1967. She was appointed US ambassador to Ghana in 1974 and to Czechoslovakia in 1989.

    Key quote:

    “I stopped believing in Santa Claus when I was six. Mother took me to see him in a department store and he asked for my autograph.”


    And of course not forgetting…

    10. Donald Trump

    Famous for:

    Firing dozens of unsuccessful candidates in the US version of The Apprentice. Golf courses. Trump University.

    Career in politics:

    Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States of America without any prior political qualification.

    Nicknames used by him:

    Crooked Hillary – Hillary Clinton. Rocket Man – Kim Jong-un. Pocahontas – US senator Elizabeth Warren.


    Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Cynthia Nixon and 10 other celebrities who entered politics

Sex and the City actress Cynthia Nixon announced on Monday she will run for governor of New York, challenging incumbent Andrew Cuomo for the Democratic nomination.

It follows the announcement last month that Clueless actress Stacey Dash is running for congress in California on a Republican ticket.

Plenty of famous faces have campaigned for candidates in the past – but why do so many celebrities decide to enter politics themselves?

“The facts show that people like Ronald Reagan and Donald Trump have had great success in politics,” says Dr Sharon Coen, senior lecturer in media psychology at the University of Salford.

“If they are already in the public eye, they are already present on people’s radar – we feel like we’re friends with them, or a version of them.

“This increases the feelings of likeability, familiarity and trust – which are all key factors that are determinant in the success of a political candidate.”

In addition, Dr Coen says the backgrounds of many actors and celebrities in performance make them particularly suited to the political sphere.

“These individuals are trained to communicate effectively with audiences. And research shows non-verbal skills are just as important, when it comes to voters, as what people actually say.”

Another key factor is already being in the limelight. “Politicians frequently say they feel like they are under siege by the media,” Dr Coen explains.

  • Celebrity support in UK and US election campaigns
  • Oprah not interested in presidential bid
  • Celebs and politics: It rarely works

    “This means normal people who may have the calling to go into politics, who actually care about society, and who want to make a change are discouraged by this.

    “What stops them is the toll that they – and the people close to them – would have to pay. Celebrities already know how to deal with this and have developed strategies to help them cope. I sincerely believe politicians should have training in this area too.”

    Many celebrities who don’t necessarily become politicians themselves are often keen to make their political beliefs known, sometimes by actively campaigning for a particular candidate.

    Katy Perry and Beyonce were among those to openly back Hillary Clinton during the US presidential election of 2016.

    But Matteo Bergamini, from the political advocacy Shout Out UK, argues that relying on celebrities to make politics more “attractive” to young people is a “tired trope”.

    Writing for the Huffington Post, he claims it “perpetuates the myth that young people are simply not interested enough in their own futures to get involved unless someone wraps it up in a shiny bow. Surely our young people deserve more credit than that?”

    So, is it a good idea for celebrities to dabble in politics, and how many have managed to make the transition?

    Here are just some of the celebrities who have turned their hand to politics – some more successfully than others…


    1. Arnold Schwarzenegger

    Famous for:

    The young Austrian bodybuilder won Mr Universe, aged just 20. He went on to star in numerous films – most famously the Terminator franchise.

    Career in politics:

    Was elected Governor of California in 2003, serving two terms.

    Nickname:

    Arnie, The Governator.


    2. Katie Price

    Famous for:

    Her surgically-enhanced glamour modelling career. Her numerous marriages. Being a best-selling author. Coming runner-up in the selection process to represent the UK at the 2005 Eurovision Song Contest. Her outspoken comments on just about everything.

    Career in politics:

    She pledged free plastic surgery for all, more nudist beaches and a ban on parking tickets in her campaign as an independent candidate in the Manchester seat of Stretford and Urmston in 2001.

    Despite promising “a bigger, betta [sic] future”, Ms Price won just 713 votes and lost her deposit.

    Key quote:

    “I know it will take a big swing but there’s no bigger swinger than me,” said Price in 2001.


    3. Manny Pacquiao

    Famous for:

    World champion boxer who won 11 major world titles – and the first in history to do so across four weight classes of boxing: flyweight, featherweight, lightweight and welterweight.

    Career in politics:

    Pacquiao was elected to the Philippines House of Representatives in 2010. In 2016 he was elected as a senator.

    Nickname:

    Pac Man, The Destroyer.


    4. Ronald Reagan

    Famous for:

    Film actor who starred in westerns, including Santa Fe Trail with Errol Flynn and Olivia de Havilland, and the Oscar-nominated King’s Row.

    Career in politics:

    Hollywood actor Reagan went on to serve first as governor of California and then as US president from 1981 to 1989.

    Nickname:

    The Great Communicator. His Secret Service codename was “Raw Hide”.


    5. Glenda Jackson

    Famous for:

    Jackson won two best actress Oscars over a 30-year career for Women in Love and A Touch of Class. She also received an Emmy for the TV drama Elizabeth R.

    Career in politics:

    Elected Labour MP for Hampstead and Highgate in 1992, she became a junior minister in Tony Blair’s 1997 government. Jackson stood down at the 2015 election, saying it was time for someone else to have a turn – and declared she would return to acting.

    Key quote:

    “The important thing in acting is to be able to laugh and cry. If I have to laugh, I think of my sex life. If I have to cry, I think of my sex life.”


    6. Al Murray

    Famous for:

    Being a regular on the stand-up and television satire circuits. Murray’s outspoken character The Pub Landlord was featured in many comedy sketch shows before the British comedian landed his own chat show, Al Murray’s Happy Hour.

    Career in politics:

    Murray announced he would run in the 2015 election in the South Thanet constituency – the same seat being contested by UKIP leader Nigel Farage. He won just 318 votes.

    Key quote:

    “It seems to me that the UK is ready for a bloke waving a pint around, offering commonsense solutions.”


    7. Imran Khan

    Famous for:

    Being a Test cricket fast bowler for Pakistan. In 1992 Khan led his team to victory in the Cricket World Cup, defeating England – it’s the only time Pakistan has won the competition. He’s also known for marrying socialite Jemima Goldsmith.

    Career in politics:

    In 1996, Khan founded the political party PTI in Pakistan.

    He was defeated in the 2013 elections, but Khan says he still wants to fulfil his ambition of becoming Pakistan’s next prime minister following parliamentary elections, due in July this year.

    Nickname:

    The Lion of Lahore.

    8. Wyclef Jean

    Famous for:

    The Haitian rapper/singer/producer won three Grammys as part of hip-hop group The Fugees. He went on to have a successful solo career.

    Career in politics:

    In 2010, after helping with the earthquake relief effort, Wyclef formally filed papers as a candidate for the Haitian presidential election.

    He was disqualified, however, after it emerged he did not fulfil the residency requirement of living in the country for five years before the election.

    Key quote:

    “It was important that I became successful. People say they do it for the love, and yes, you do it for the love, but you want to be successful.”

    9. Shirley Temple

    Famous for:

    Finding international fame, at the age of seven, in Bright Eyes and becoming the first child star to be honoured with a miniature Juvenile Oscar for her film accomplishments in 1935.

    Career in politics:

    The actress ran unsuccessfully for congress in 1967. She was appointed US ambassador to Ghana in 1974 and to Czechoslovakia in 1989.

    Key quote:

    “I stopped believing in Santa Claus when I was six. Mother took me to see him in a department store and he asked for my autograph.”


    And of course not forgetting…

    10. Donald Trump

    Famous for:

    Firing dozens of unsuccessful candidates in the US version of The Apprentice. Golf courses. Trump University.

    Career in politics:

    Donald Trump became the 45th president of the United States of America without any prior political qualification.

    Nicknames used by him:

    Crooked Hillary – Hillary Clinton. Rocket Man – Kim Jong-un. Pocahontas – US senator Elizabeth Warren.


    Follow us on Facebook, on Twitter @BBCNewsEnts, or on Instagram at bbcnewsents. If you have a story suggestion email entertainment.news@bbc.co.uk.

Uber self-driving crash: Footage shows moment before impact

Police have released two videos showing the moments leading up to a fatal crash involving a self-driving Uber car in Tempe, Arizona, on Sunday.

In the 14-second video, the autonomous vehicle is seen failing to slow down before hitting Elaine Herzberg, 49, who is walking her bike across the road.

One video shows dashcam footage of the impact. The other, an Uber operator monitoring the car’s controls.

Uber has suspended self-driving tests in North America following the crash.

In footage released on Wednesday by the Tempe police department, the human Uber operator sitting inside the Volvo appears to be looking down at something while the vehicle is travelling in autonomous mode.

Moments later, the woman appears visibly shocked as she looks up to see Ms Herzberg crossing the highway in their path seconds before impact.

“The video is disturbing and heartbreaking to watch, and our thoughts continue to be with Elaine’s loved ones,” Uber said in a statement.

“Our cars remain grounded, and we’re assisting local, state and federal authorities in any way we can,” the statement added.

Police said the accident happened on Sunday night, adding that Ms Herzberg had not been using a pedestrian crossing.

Ms Herzberg was taken to a local hospital following the collision but died of her injuries.

The US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board earlier said they would be investigating the incident in Tempe.

While self-driving cars have been involved in multiple accidents, it is thought to be the first time an autonomous car has been involved in a fatal collision with a pedestrian.

A blueberry muffin ‘could have day’s worth of sugar’

Some blueberry muffins sold by cafes and supermarkets contain more than the recommended daily intake of sugar for adults, researchers have discovered.

An analysis by Action on Sugar and the Obesity Health Alliance in January found the cakes could contain up to eight teaspoons of sugar.

The recommended daily limit for adults is seven – for children it is less.

Health experts said the findings showed it was “all too easy” to consume “huge” amounts of sugar.

  • ‘Limit children’s snacks to 100 calories’
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    ‘Limited labelling’

    Action on Sugar and the Obesity Health Alliance, which looked at 28 muffins sold in food outlets in train stations and supermarkets, found 61% of them contained six teaspoons of sugar or more – the upper daily limit for a child aged seven-to-10 years old.

    They also found muffins bought at train station food retailers had 19% more sugar per portion and were 32% bigger than those bought in supermarkets.

    There was also a big variation, with muffins from Marks and Spencer containing just three teaspoons.

    Caroline Cerny, from the Obesity Health Alliance, said: “We may think grabbing a blueberry muffin is a reasonably healthy option for a snack on the go compared to other cakes or a chocolate bar – yet the figures suggest otherwise.

    “There is huge variation in both the size of muffins and the sugar content, and with limited nutrition labelling, it’s all too easy to eat a huge amount of sugar in just one serving.”

    The research also found a lack of nutrition labelling on a number of muffins, both those sold in stations and in supermarkets.

    The two organisations are now calling for manufacturers to reduce sugar in line with the government’s plans to cut it by 20% in common products by 2020.

    They are also calling for front-of-pack “traffic-light” nutrition labelling to be mandatory across all products, including the out-of-home sector.

    The British Retail Consortium, which represents food retailers, said its members were “actively engaged” in Public Health England’s sugar reduction strategy and had removed thousands of tonnes of sugar in products such as bakery items.

    Andrea Martinez-Inchausti, its deputy director of food policy, added: “Food-to-go retailers that provide takeaway products proactively provide energy information for their products and have further nutrition information available whilst all major supermarkets have led the way in providing clear labelling using the UK recommended front-of-pack scheme.”

    Costa told the BBC that the figure of 40.3g of sugar for its blueberry muffins is not correct. It said this figure appeared on its nutritional information as a result of an internal error. The sugar content was previously 33.4g per muffin, Costa said.


    NHS recommended sugar limits guidelines

    • Children aged four to six: Five teaspoons of sugar per day
    • Children seven to 10: Six teaspoons
    • Adults: Seven teaspoons View comments

A blueberry muffin ‘could have day’s worth of sugar’

Some blueberry muffins sold by cafes and supermarkets contain more than the recommended daily intake of sugar for adults, researchers have discovered.

An analysis by Action on Sugar and the Obesity Health Alliance in January found the cakes could contain up to eight teaspoons of sugar.

The recommended daily limit for adults is seven – for children it is less.

Health experts said the findings showed it was “all too easy” to consume “huge” amounts of sugar.

  • ‘Limit children’s snacks to 100 calories’
  • Kids devouring ‘breakfast sugar’

    ‘Limited labelling’

    Action on Sugar and the Obesity Health Alliance, which looked at 28 muffins sold in food outlets in train stations and supermarkets, found 61% of them contained six teaspoons of sugar or more – the upper daily limit for a child aged seven-to-10 years old.

    They also found muffins bought at train station food retailers had 19% more sugar per portion and were 32% bigger than those bought in supermarkets.

    There was also a big variation, with muffins from Marks and Spencer containing just three teaspoons.

    Caroline Cerny, from the Obesity Health Alliance, said: “We may think grabbing a blueberry muffin is a reasonably healthy option for a snack on the go compared to other cakes or a chocolate bar – yet the figures suggest otherwise.

    “There is huge variation in both the size of muffins and the sugar content, and with limited nutrition labelling, it’s all too easy to eat a huge amount of sugar in just one serving.”

    The research also found a lack of nutrition labelling on a number of muffins, both those sold in stations and in supermarkets.

    The two organisations are now calling for manufacturers to reduce sugar in line with the government’s plans to cut it by 20% in common products by 2020.

    They are also calling for front-of-pack “traffic-light” nutrition labelling to be mandatory across all products, including the out-of-home sector.

    The British Retail Consortium, which represents food retailers, said its members were “actively engaged” in Public Health England’s sugar reduction strategy and had removed thousands of tonnes of sugar in products such as bakery items.

    Andrea Martinez-Inchausti, its deputy director of food policy, added: “Food-to-go retailers that provide takeaway products proactively provide energy information for their products and have further nutrition information available whilst all major supermarkets have led the way in providing clear labelling using the UK recommended front-of-pack scheme.”

    Costa told the BBC that the figure of 40.3g of sugar for its blueberry muffins is not correct. It said this figure appeared on its nutritional information as a result of an internal error. The sugar content was previously 33.4g per muffin, Costa said.


    NHS recommended sugar limits guidelines

    • Children aged four to six: Five teaspoons of sugar per day
    • Children seven to 10: Six teaspoons
    • Adults: Seven teaspoons View comments

Blurred Lines: Marvin Gaye’s family keeps $5m payout

Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams copied one of Marvin Gaye’s songs to create their 2013 smash Blurred Lines, an appeal court has ruled.

The court upheld a 2015 verdict against the stars, which means Gaye’s family will get to keep a $5m (£3.5m) payout.

In addition, the family will receive 50% of future royalties from Blurred Lines.

Yet one judge dissented from the verdict, saying the two songs “differed in melody, harmony and rhythm”.

Circuit Judge Jacqueline Nguyen added that the ruling “strikes a devastating blow to future musicians and composers everywhere”.

In the original 2015 trial, a jury found that Blurred Lines had copied Gaye’s 1973 hit Got To Give It Up – despite many observers claiming the songs were only similar in feel, rather than composition.

Thicke, Williams and rapper TI, who contributed a verse to the track, launched an appeal in 2016 and were backed by 212 fellow songwriters, among them John Oates, Jason Mraz and members of Linkin Park.

They argued the verdict “threaten[ed] to punish songwriters for creating new music that is inspired by prior works.”

But the 9th US Circuit Court of Appeals largely upheld the decision, while clearing TI – real name Clifford Harris Jr – of any copyright infringement.

The judges rejected Williams and Thicke’s request to order a new trial, saying Gaye’s copyright was entitled to broad protection.

They also accepted the original judge’s decision to instruct the jury to reach their verdict based only on the sheet music to the songs and not the recordings.

You can see the full ruling here.

Wednesday’s decision prompted a strong dissent from Circuit Judge Jacqueline Nguyen.

She said the decision let the Gayes “accomplish what no one has before: copyright a musical style” and expanded the potential for further copyright litigation.

“The Gayes, no doubt, are pleased by this outcome,” she wrote. “They shouldn’t be.

“They own copyrights in many musical works, each of which (including Got To Give It Up) now potentially infringes the copyright of any famous song that preceded it.

“That is the consequence of the majority’s uncritical deference to music experts.”

‘A victory for musicians’

Howard King, a lawyer for Thicke and Williams, said Judge Nguyen’s comment “enhances the prospects” his clients might prevail in an appeal.

“These are two entirely different songs,” he said.

Two of Gaye’s children, Frankie and Nona, called the decision “a victory for the rights of all musicians.”

Their mother Jan added it was a “wonderful recognition of Marvin’s creativity and the lasting value of one of his greatest songs.”

Musicologists have reacted with disappointment to the ruling, saying it might hinder creativity in the future.

Joe Bennett, a professor at Berklee College of Music, wrote a note-by-note comparison of the two songs in 2014 and concluded they only shared a groove.

“What they have in common is indicative of the time period,” he told Forbes this week.

“If my favourite artist uses a cowbell and I use one too, can you copyright the cowbell? Both are arguing that their side is good for creators.

“That’s why so many of the young songwriters are concerned. What’s the threshold? How much can I be influenced by my favourite artist?”

‘Horrible precedent’

Since the Blurred Lines trial, there have been a number of similar cases against such artists as Bruno Mars, Ed Sheeran, Madonna and Miley Cyrus.

Others have sought to pre-empt any copyright claims – including Taylor Swift, who gifted Right Said Fred a writing credit on her single Look What You Made Me Do after noticing a passing similarity to their hit I’m Too Sexy.

Meanwhile, Thicke, Williams and TI issued a joint statement about Wednesday’s ruling, claiming it set a “horrible precedent”.

“Blurred Lines was created from the heart and minds of Pharrell, Robin and TI and not taken from anyone or anywhere else,” they said.

“We are reviewing the decision, considering our options and you will hear more from us soon about this matter.”

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